Who REALLY Is Accountable for Training?

Who is Really Accountable for Training?

finally got this concrete out of the Colorado earth—using every tool I own.

But at least I had the tools.

This image provides us a clear message: People can succeed—and usually do—when they have the right tools.

But in this missive, we’re not talking about physical tools like shovels, vehicles, computers, and smart phones—but rather knowledge, skills, and competencies.

And the responsibility for people acquiring tools like these through “training and development” lies with, um, whom exactly?

Two parties.

1) Managers, with whom we share this truth:

4 CommentsManagement, Personal Accountability

Ever Overreact With Your Teenager?

Reactions2

This email came to us just the other day. Enjoy!

Dear QBQ, Inc.—

My manager just took our department through the “Personal Accountability and the QBQ!” training, and I wanted to say thank you! Personal accountability is something I try to integrate into my daily living, but sometimes fail at it.

The QBQ! training came at a perfect time. Not only has it given me a tool to use at work, but at home as a mom.

As most parents know, communication with a teenager is a very challenging mountain to climb—and I was not sure I would ever “reach the top.”

While sitting in the QBQ! session, I received this text from our 17-year-old:

“Mom, there’s no way I can get to the school by 3:15 today to get Johnny.”

My initial reaction was essentially this:

2 CommentsParenting, Personal Accountability

All That Glitters Is Not Effective

accountability is not a fad

As we wind down this year and look toward the next, let’s keep in mind this thought from the QBQ! book:

The old stuff is the good stuff.

I had a colleague years ago who often said this:

“That idea worked so well I stopped using it.”

It was his tongue-in-cheek way of chastising himself for letting good ideas, practices, and habits fall out of his life. Essentially, he was asking this question:

9 CommentsManagement, Personal Accountability

How QBQ! Is Helping One Man Face Cancer

An email from a reader of our QBQ! QuickNote blogs …

Hey, John!

I just read your blog titled “Why I’ll Never Go Into the Woods Again!” You wrote, “Sometimes our fears hold us back from ‘climbing that mountain,’ ‘reaching the summit,’ and ‘being our best.’”

Prior to getting into my “fear” story, I should tell you that wherever I go, I carry your QBQ! book. A little tattered and torn now, but by reading a chapter each day, I am able to stay on track. I’ve learned that personal accountability is what I need to practice at work and at home.

My story is about a “fear” that just became part of my life in the last few weeks and how I am managing it.

12 CommentsPersonal Accountability

A QBQ! Pro at Bass Pro

Author, Ken Blanchard (and fellow Cornell University grad), speaks to how critical it is to have “raving fans.” Certainly, we all love to have some of those!

So I asked a guy who was raving about the QBQ! book’s message of personal accountability to tell me why he feels the way he does. Just doing research. 🙂

In response, Jerry Rogers, an outstanding leader to anyone who works with and for him at the Stapleton Mall Bass Pro store in Denver, Colorado, shared this: Jerry2

QBQ! is exactly what those who sincerely want to be better leaders, parents, and people need. The reason QBQ! fits so well at Bass Pro Shops is we sincerely want to be better at serving others. I cannot be an effective servant leader if I’m not willing to look in the mirror and acknowledge not only what I might be doing wrong, but what I can do to make it better. QBQ! speaks to exactly this and eliminates the victim mentality and blame that our society perpetuates. We all make choices and many of us at Bass Pro Shops have chosen to adopt QBQ! and its personal accountability message to help us improve our service levels every day!”

2 CommentsUncategorized

The #1 Killer of “One Team, One Goal!”

silo final final.jpg

 “I can sum up all our problems in a few words: ‘silos and butt-covering.’”

QBQ! The Question Behind the Question

A good author doesn’t date stories or quotes in his books because doing so gives the reader or audience member a built-in objection. They might think, Hmm, old. Must not be relevant anymore.

In this case, though, knowing that an executive made the statement above to me in the mid 1990’s might actually help. You might think, Huh, I see nothing has changed!

That is, you could think that if you work for an organization …

11 CommentsPersonal Accountability