Parenting the QBQ Way: The Financial Piece

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Note: John shares about this blog on Periscope/YouTube here:

When Miller Child #5, Charlene, landed her first job ever (at Target), she went online to view her first paycheck:


If I recall correctly, she shrieked, “I’m rich!”

Well, no, but if you manage your money well, you may be someday—especially if you avoid asking Incorrect Questions or “IQs” (visit here for a quick tutorial) such as these:

Kristi of L.L. Bean Saves the Day!

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ll bean

***Excerpted from the QBQ! companion book: Flipping the Switch

My friend, Michael DeVito, had a problem. For months, he and some friends had been planning a weekend hiking trip to the Adirondacks. The Wednesday evening before they were to go, Michael was in Chicago on business when he suddenly realized he had forgotten one very important detail: boots. The Adirondacks in March promised to be cold and wet. Michael had meant to order some new hiking boots but hadn’t gotten to it, so here he was, two days before the trip, with no boots. And he was out of town.

Is Personal Accountability On YOUR Radar?


I lunched with David, a representative of an outstanding organization. He is one of thousands of field reps with the title of “coach” and he’s quite high up—in the field.

He had read the QBQ! book and told me its message of PERSONAL ACCOUNTABILITY is perfect for their world.

This fast-growth and dynamic company sells products like Shakeology meal-replacement drink and Insanity, P90X, and TurboJam workout DVDs.

Excellent stuff!

Coaches such as David help customers lead healthier lives through those products, as well as Facebook exercise “challenge groups” and personal consultation. They also support their “downline” recruits in achieving financial freedom.

In our time together, David said, “We need to get some QBQ! books to the execs at the headquarters!”

So I shipped ‘em out. 

Meanwhile, I talked with three other field coaches. Their comments: 

15 Things You Don’t Need College To Learn

We want you written on a chalkboard at the office

I make one statement in my “How to Be An Outstanding Organization!” speaking engagements that generates spontaneous applause—and it’s this:

“Outstanding organizations hire and promote character over credentials and college degrees.”

I suspect those who clap have been passed over for a pay increase and bigger title—or didn’t get hired somewhere—because they skipped college or didn’t attend the “right” school. Sadly, they’ve felt the pain of watching someone else win the opportunity they sought. Also sadly, the employer possibly missed out on the person of character desperately needed.

You know, the person who does crazy, unusual, and abnormal stuff like this:

Blame: The Spreadable Sin


So often people say, “There’s plenty of blame to go around!”—a favorite phrase of the media. It seems to be our human nature to immediately ask Whodunnit?! when something happens that was unplanned, disappointing, or embarrassing.

When it all goes wrong—even if we know in our heart that what we did was stupid—it’s tempting to spread the blame around saying, “Well, yeah, I did do that, but, you see, that person over there made me do it!”

Or this: “I accept 65% of the blame, but he/she is 35% responsible, too!”

In the ’70s, a common phrase that adorned car bumpers was this:

For Outstanding Organizations, The Customer Is Never a Burden

Make me Feel Important

The King Soopers grocery store recruiting manager asked, “So, Jazzy, what does good customer service look like to you?”

With 17 years of life under her belt, Jazzy responded:

“Good customer service is being outgoing, friendly, and approachable; making customers feel like they’re your #1 priority and never a burden.”

“Um, okay, well, so … when can you start?”

When Miller Child #6—Jazzy Joy—shared this exchange with Karen and me, we beamed. “Good for you, Jazz!” we said in stereo.

And at that moment, my mind went back 24 hours …

Courtesy, Rudeness, Meetings, and Teamwork

Readers, can you help us solve a problem???


I received this email from Betty:

“John, the 10 questions for better communication in your blog titled Why don’t THEY communicate better? is Just More Blame really helped me. They also made me reflect on a communication problem we’re having: People who interrupt. Two team members in our department frequently interrupt colleagues during meetings, including the director, who is our boss.”

After reading the rest of Betty’s email (below), essentially describing four scenarios, I couldn’t resist titling them. So the headings are mine, while the descriptions are hers.

Let’s continue with her email: